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How to Install an Inground Trampoline

How to Install an Inground Trampoline Ever since I was a kid I’ve loved inground trampolines. We had them at my grandparent’s house and at their cabin. They were so easy to run on and off of, take turns on, and were super convenient for us as kids.

When I was a teenager, we had an above-ground trampoline at our house. I was in charge of mowing our home lawn for years. It was tedious and annoying having to recruit one or two family members to help me move the trampoline half way through my lawn mow so I could mow under it.

My brother had an above ground trampoline with a net. His kids sometimes played with it. Then he had it installed inground and now the kids never stop playing with it. They don’t need help getting on or off, and there are fewer injuries and less fighting.

For these reasons, I decided we would have our trampoline installed inground.

I got two quotes for it and was shocked when it came to $1,500.00 for one and $2,000.00 for the other. Because we were already paying for new sod we didn’t have enough saved to also pay an additional 2k for an inground trampoline install.

I did some Google searching and came across this great tutorial on AllThingsThrifty-awesome site by the way- and followed it (for the most part). We had to use some different materials and made a mistake along the way—our fault. I’ll tell you the mistake we made and how we ended up fixing it in the steps below.

It cost us about $375 to install our trampoline. So by doing it ourselves we saved $1,125!

Plus, I got a great deal on the trampoline itself. I saved $117.00 (got it for $150.00) at Walmart the day after Thanksgiving!

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for yours kids.

It is the BouncePro 14′ trampoline. It has almost 500 reviews which I read very carefully and almost 5 stars. Its really a quality trampoline for a very reasonable price—even at it’s retail price. You can find it at Walmart here, or Amazon here.

The supplies we used are listed below.

IMPORTANT- Before starting a digging project you’ll want to call your city service ‘call before you dig’ (usually it is free in most cities). Google yours. They usually require 48 hours notice and will mark major things that you don’t want to hit and break while digging. Most back yards do not contain major pipes like water, sewer, etc. but to be sure just call them, it will bring you peace of mind and prevent a potential issue.

Here’s how we installed our trampoline inground.

First, we rented a little excavator from HomeDepot. We rented the largest one they had but it was still pretty small… which worked great because we didn’t have to take down our fence to get it into the backyard. My brother-in-law who is a heavy equipment driver said he’d dig the hole for us. It was so funny seeing him on this tiny machine. Since he is used to much larger machines he said he felt like he was digging out a teaspoon of dirt at a time. We had a good laugh about that.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for yours kids.

Before he began we laid the trampoline down where we wanted it and spray painted on the ground around it; then he worked his magic. In about 3-3.5 hours we had a perfectly sized hole. If you don’t have a gate to worry about, I’d recommend renting from another heavy equipment rental place so you can get a bigger machine and the digging goes faster.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for yours kids.

While he was digging the hole we set the entire trampoline up. We made sure to put the trampoline mat and springs on it (so that it would make it sturdy and the correct shape).

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for your kids.

After the digging, my son had a super fun time sliding down the sand mound.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for your kids.

Completed hole. It is deeper than it looks. My son is over 3′ tall. For those worried about drainage. We have sandy soil and the water drains very well. It has rained 45 times in the last 60 days and we have not had any water pool. IF you have clay or other tough soil I have read to dig a bit deeper and fill in a few inches deep with gravel and rocks for drainage. But if you have normal or sandy soil it will drain just fine without.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for your kids.

Then, we cut pressure treated 2×4’s to size (two for each section) This is a 14′ tramp with twelve sections so we had to have 24 cuts of wood.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for your kids.

Then we predrilled the wood so that drilling into the legs of the trampoline would go more quickly. Pre-drilling saved time, but drilling at an angle was tricky. Be sure to do this part carefully so you don’t waste the semi-expensive wood.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for your kids.

As we went along drilling holes into the trampoline we put the bolts, washers, and nuts on. We knew that jumping on a tramp is likely to rattle the frame so we got self-locking nuts and washers. We installed the bolts in the following formula:

Bolt-washer-wood-trampoline leg-washer-nut

Then we measured and cut the sheet metal accordingly. We screwed the metal onto the wood. The mistake we made was not following the advice from the allthingsthrifty tutorial to fold the metal over… After the tramp was installed, we found out why the metal should be folded over… the sheet metal could cut someone’s foot if they hit it just right.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes a trampoline easier to access and safer for your kids.

Then we took off the trampoline mat off so that we could easily lift and place the tramp in the ground.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Makes trampolines easier to access and safer for your kids.

We did shovel/trench out the dirt a little deeper for the legs and bricks.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Make a trampoline easier to access and safer for your kids.

We used bricks, dirt, a long 1×2 and a level to get it just right.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Make a trampoline easier to access and safer for your kids.

Once it was right we filled the dirt up to the sides of the outside walls and installed the trampoline mat. I had my landscapers who were installing the sod move the sprinklers so that they wouldn’t spray the tramp and waste water.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Make a trampoline easier to access and safer for your kids.

Then the sod was installed. You can do this even if you have existing sod. My brother did it and it worked out great.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Make a trampoline easier to access and safer for your kids.

Like the tutorial we used, we installed the tramp so that there was a bit of a gap between the frame and the grass (about 2 inches). In the first few days we had several birds get trapped under it. We had to undo the springs, crawl under, catch them and let them loose!

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Make a trampoline easier to access and safer for your kids.

After that happening twice we got pool noodles and stuck them under each side. This prevents the birds and other animals getting in, my kids and their friends from putting stuff down into the hole, and prevents anyone from stepping on the sheet metal that sticks up a tad. With just few bucks spent on pool noodles both problems have been solved.

How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Make a trampoline easier to access and safer for your kids.

A Saturday project, a few trips to HomeDepot, and my brother-in-law’s digging skills saved us $1,125!

Foamswordfightsontrampoline

My son LOVES the trampoline. He runs on and off it without any trouble. I don’t have to worry about him falling off. It entertains him for hours. I don’t have to help him or his friends who come to play on and off it either. I also don’t have to move the tramp when we mow. It has been a huge blessing and so much fun!

We have trampoline sword fights with these amazing and durable—yet inexpensive foam swords pretty much every day the weather is good. I actually love to jump on it too. I am still a kid at heart I guess.

Supplies:

  • Twelve 2X4X8 of pressure treated wood– in order to calculate this we measured the distance between the two legs on each section which was just over 3.5′ for one edge and almost 4′ for the every other edge. We wanted 2 pieces of wood on each section so we went with an 8′ long 2×4. There were 12 sections on our tramp so we bought 12 of them.
  • Six 24″x8′ Roof panel galvanized metal sheeting- We cut these down to the correct length (getting two walls for each piece).
  • Roofing screws (to screw the metal onto the wood). 8-12 per section.
  • Bricks or cinder blocks (a few for each leg/section). We used bricks.
  • Bolts (4 for each section) We used bolts that were 5″ long with about 1.5 of thread (so the bolt could go through the 2×4 and trampoline leg)
  • Self-Locking Nuts- so they don’t come loose with the jumping on the tramp (1 for each bolt)
  • Self-Locking Washers– so they don’t wiggle loose (2 for each bolt)
  • Optional- pool noodles (see above for the reason why)

Tools:

  • Excavator
  • Spray Paint
  • Shovel
  • Level
  • Tin Snips
  • Two wrenches that fit the bolts and nuts
  • Hammer
  • Drill
  • Pencil/Pen
  • Measuring tape
  • Extra 2×4 or 1×2 to set the level on

Please ask if you have any questions about this project.

Have fun!

Anita

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How to Install an Inground Trampoline- Step-by-step easy to follow instructions. Make a trampoline easier to access and safer for your kids.



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17 Responses to How to Install an Inground Trampoline

  1. This looks so fun! My son would’ve loved having a digger in our backyard (if we had a backyard haha). I am definitely saving this for the future!!

  2. justjayma says:

    Did you do any thing under the tramp for drainage of water?

    • Anita Fowler says:

      No we have sandy soil and the water drains very well. It has rained 45 times in the last 60 days and we have not had any water pool. IF you have clay or other tough soil I have read to dig a bit deeper and fill in a few inches deep with gravel and rocks for drainage. But if you have normal or sandy soil it will drain just fine without.

  3. Brandi Wilson says:

    This looks like so much fun! I will have to consider doing something like this for Boyd one day soon. He would love it!

  4. torontomum says:

    Hi,
    This looks great, thanks. A couple of questions — any injuries from jumping on the springs? i know that is a common cause of injuries. Do you let more than one child at a time on the trampoline?
    Finally, what do you do in winter? do you cover it?
    thanks!

    • Anita Fowler says:

      No injuries from the springs they are covered well. I let multiple kids jump at the same time and thus far no accidents. we will just leave the cover on in the winter. Most people around here do and despite lots of snow the tramps still last a long time.

  5. […] the spray nozzle that I plan on using to spray the toys down outside. I’ll throw them on our D.I.Y. In-Ground Trampoline to dry and then come and collect the the toys I want in a black bag with my trusty and […]

  6. Dustin says:

    How have the walls been holding up against the dirt? I think a lot of guys do circular retaining walls for this. The sheet metal looks cheaper though, I’m just worried about liability since I’ll be doing this for a customer.

    • Anita Fowler says:

      The walls have held up great. We use the trampoline daily. If anything we should have dug the hole just a bit deeper as the trampoline has settled in. But its plenty deep for little kids. Teenagers may need a deeper hole.

  7. It looks like your little boy had just as much fun playing on the pile of dirt, so cute! I really look how you drill the wood directly into the legs of the tramp, that way it is nice and secure. It’s also a really smart idea to put the metal around, so that you don’t have to worry about stuff getting in underneath it.

  8. Amy says:

    How did you fold the sheet metal so that there’s no sharp edges? Is it easy to fold sheet metal? Don’t have any experience with sheet metal so that’s why I’m asking 🙂 Also, do you think sheet metal is the best material to use to retain the wall? Any other material that you think would work?

    • Anita Fowler says:

      The sheet metal works great. Over time the sheet metal has become covered by dirt, but for the first two years we used pool noodles to protect the edges. We didn’t follow the original instructions to fold the sheet metal over but using a set of heavy duty pliars and sheet metal cutters it should be fairly easy to do.

  9. Nic says:

    I’ve heard that in ground trampolines suffer from not having any place for the air to escape. The theory is that when someone jumps on the tramp they are pushing air down. Without an air escape vent the air becomes pressurized and the tramp doesn’t feel as bouncy. Have you experienced this? As the grown-up child I am, I want to jump on the tramp! How does your tramp work for adults? Any air pressure issues?

    • Anita Fowler says:

      There have been absolutely no pressure issues. I jump on our tramp in spring and summer daily with my children and absolutely LOVE it! It is used way more because it is so easy to get on and off! Highly recommend this and have experienced no issues.

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